Japanese  

TECHNOLOGY — tech — nanowires

Anti-counterfeit 'Fingerprints' Made from Silver Nanowires

Posted 5 months ago
by Institute of Physics

Unique patterns made from tiny, randomly scattered silver nanowires have been created by a group of researchers from South Korea in an attempt to authenticate goods and tackle the growing problem of counterfeiting.

The nanoscale 'fingerprints' are made by randomly dumping 20 to 30 individual nanowires, each with an average length of 10 to 50 µm, onto a thin plastic film, and could be used to tag a variety of goods from electronics and drugs to credit cards and bank notes.

They have been presented in a paper published today, 21 March, in IOP Publishing's journal Nanotechnology.

According to the researchers, the fingerprints are almost impossible to replicate because of the natural randomness of their creation and the difficulty associated with manipulating such small materials.

Lead author of the research Professor Hyotcherl Ihee, from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and Institute for Basic Science (IBS), said: "It is nearly impossible to replicate the fingerprints due to the difficulty in trying to manipulate the tiny nanowires into a desired pattern. The cost of generating such an identical counterfeit pattern would generally be much higher than the value of the typical product being protected."

The researchers estimate that the fingerprints could be produced at a cost of less than $1 per single pattern, which was demonstrated in their study by synthesizing a solution containing individual silver nanowires, coating the nanowires with silica, doping them with specific fluorescent dyes and then randomly dropping them onto a transferable film made from flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET).

The fluorescent dyes allowed the patterns, which are invisible to the naked eye, to be visually identified and authenticated under an optical microscope and could add another layer of complexity to the 'fingerprints' if a number of different coloured dyes are used.

The researchers believe the fingerprints could also be tagged with a unique ID, or barcode, which could facilitate a quick search in a database and ease the process of authentication or counterfeit identification.

"Once a pattern is tagged and stored on a database using a unique ID, a certain substrate, whether this is a bank note or a credit card, could be authenticated almost immediately by observing the fluorescence images and comparing it with stored images," continued Professor Ihee.

"These authentication processes can be automated by employing an algorithm that recognises the positions and colours of the silver nanowires and digitizes that information in a database. Such digitized information could significantly reduce the size of the stored data and reduce the time required for the authentication process."

According to the World Customs Organisation, around six per cent of global traded goods are counterfeit, which the researchers believe could be reduced by using their technique to authenticate goods.

"Compared to other anti-counterfeit methods, the fingerprints are cheap and simple to produce, they are extremely difficult to replicate and can be authenticated very straightforwardly," concluded Professor Ihee.



This story provided by ScienceNewsline, the daily online science and technology news portal. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the ScienceNewsline or Technobahn.com.

Related
Researchers Create Highly Conductive And Elastic Conductors Using Silver Nanowires
13 July 2012
Researchers Devise New, Stretchable Antenna for Wearable Health Monitoring
18 March 2014
Silver Nanowire Sensors Hold Promise for Prosthetics, Robotics
16 January 2014
Stanford Engineers Weld Nanowires with Light
06 February 2012
Innovation Could Bring Flexible Solar Cells, Transistors, Displays
22 May 2013
More
nature
New Study Charts the Global Invasion of Crop Pests

Many of the world's most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the cen...
biology
Paleontology: Oldest Representative of a Weird Arthropod Group

Biologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have assigned a number of 435-million-year-old fossils to...
biology
Evolution Used Similar Molecular Toolkits to Shape Flies, Worms, And Humans

Although separated by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, flies, worms, and humans share ancient patterns of ge...
biology
A Touching Story: The Ancient Conversation Between Plants, Fungi And Bacteria

MADISON, Wis. — The mechanical force that a single fungal cell or bacterial colony exerts on a plant cell may seem vani...
biology
Pitt And Carnegie Mellon Engineers Discover Why Learning Can Be Difficult

PITTSBURGH—Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to ability that we already possess. For example, a trained...
space
Detecting Neutrinos, Physicists Look into the Heart of the Sun

AMHERST, Mass. – Using one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists ...
biology
Big Data Approach Identifies Europe's Most Dangerous Human And Domestic Animal Pathogens

The pathogens posing the greatest risk to Europe based upon a proxy for impact have been identified by University of Li...
psychology
Parents, Listen Next Time Your Baby Babbles

Pay attention, mom and dad, especially when your infant looks at you and babbles. Parents may not understand a baby's ...
Most popular
biology
Researchers Create Cellular Automation Model to Study Complex Tumor-host Role in Cancer

Cancer remains a medical mystery – despite all of the research efforts devoted to understanding and controlling it. The...
biology
Pitt And Carnegie Mellon Engineers Discover Why Learning Can Be Difficult

PITTSBURGH—Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to ability that we already possess. For example, a trained...
economics
An Inconvenient Truth: Does Responsible Consumption Benefit Corporations More Than Society?

Are environmental and social problems such as global warming and poverty the result of inadequate governmental regulati...
biology
Evolution Used Similar Molecular Toolkits to Shape Flies, Worms, And Humans

Although separated by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, flies, worms, and humans share ancient patterns of ge...
biology
Big Data Approach Identifies Europe's Most Dangerous Human And Domestic Animal Pathogens

The pathogens posing the greatest risk to Europe based upon a proxy for impact have been identified by University of Li...

© 2014 Technobahn  |  About  |  Contact  |  Privacy  |  News Feed  |  Use of the site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement.